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Bearing Technical Presentations - UE Systems

Bearing Technical Presentations

Presentations


Ultrasound is More than a Leak Detector

Deborah Hays, GM
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Abstract:
In this presentation we will discuss how we successfully integrated ultrasound technology into our PdM program as our main approach to identifying issues that could lead to downtime. Our return on investment started within the first month of use. Our plant survived General Motors bankruptcy and we are still standing. I would like to think one of the reasons we are still here is because of the cost saving initiatives Predictive Technology spurred at Dmax.

As costs increase and sales decrease in the automotive industry, downtime is no longer acceptable under any circumstance. With this in mind we have come up with some creative ways to monitor our equipment without invasive PM’s. Ultrasound and IR are the tools we use to accomplish this task. We use IR, Ultrasonic, Vibration, and MCA at our plant. However, we have come to the conclusion that before we purchased the UE 10,000, we had no idea how much we would use it or how much money it would save us. You can use Ultrasound to check anything from conveyor bearings to ball screws, to spindles and gearboxes, and even hard to see or reach transfer bearings.


Lubrication Practices and a little bit about Compressed Air
Loyd Hopper, Predictive/Preventative Maintenance Lead Analyst
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Abstract:
My presentation is about Lubrication Practices. My discussion will cover details that many may either not be aware of or overlook as unimportant. For example, many people don’t realize how important it is to color code lubricant containers along with the grease guns. I’ll review storage of lubricants, methods for identifying which lubricant goes into what machine, how to select the right fitting, things to avoid when changing out oil or grease and of course how to prevent over lubrication. I will illustrate some current conditions and show what ideal conditions could be. It should give everyone something to talk about and relate to. I will share some interesting thoughts from seasoned maintenance technicians and engineers.

Also I will demonstrate how a company can easily justify and purchase a piece of Ultrasound Equipment; top of the line, and show an ROI in a very short time.


The Ultrasound Gun and the Infrared Camera
David Zweigenbaum, General Mills
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Abstract:
In this presentation, I’ll review the history of preventive and predictive maintenance practices in our plant and how we came to use ultrasound and infrared as key parts of these programs. I’ll explain how we use these technologies to identify bad bearings, prevent lubrication related problems, test gear boxes, sealed bearings and electric equipment. I’ll also discuss how to find leaks in compressed air systems and how locate leaking steam traps. I’ll cover some basic techniques we use to create a route, enter data into Ultratrend DMS and produce a report.


Developing an Effective Ultrasound Program
Ron Tangen, Dakota Gasification Company
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Abstract:
This session will discuss the basic steps taken in developing and implementing the ultrasound program currently in place at Dakota Gasification Company. Specific ultrasound applications now include utility system leak detection, electrical inspection, slow speed bearing monitoring, and electric motor regreasing.


Saving Time and Money with Ultrasound
Charles Strawn, Vibration Tech, International Paper Company
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Abstract:
Finding bearing faults and looking for leaks is not the only way to save money. After attending an Ultrasound Level I class I learned the benefits of using ultrasound along with vibration to save time and money. We had an old Sonic Scan which I had used to show cost saving ideals to management. It eventually justified the purchase of an Ultraprobe 15,000. To learn more, I attended the Ultrasound Level II class. After returning from that class I started to build my routes. Our equipment is broken down into A, B, and C’s. A’s being something that can shut the plant down, B’s being an environmental or process interruption and C’s are equipment that have spares or that will not be impactful on any process for a period of time. One route has 300 vibration points. I separated my A’s, B’s and C’s and tested the C’s with the UE gun. The time I saved for this one route was 4.5 hours. I have a total of 28 routes so I had to show management the cost and time savings that we could archive using the ultrasound. This presentation will cover my experiences in saving time and money by making my routes more efficient.


“Ultrasound” the Cornerstone of a Predictive Maintenance Program
Dean Schill, Quad Graphics
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Abstract:
The current economic environment has reset the expectation for most Maintenance organizations. “Doing More with Less” has become the mainstay for most companies. As the Manager of the Predictive Technology objectives for a Fortune 500 company, Dean Schill will explain the trials and tribulations that are associated with planning, implementing and sustaining a proven program.

Identifying and capitalizing on each opportunity as it is presented will produce the necessary argument for deployment of any Predictive Technologies. Defining Corporate Standards that apply to Vendors, Suppliers and OEM’s, positions your organization to be one step in front of the competition.

Ultrasound technology can redefine any Preventative Maintenance program. Simply using the technology is not enough! Allowing the technology to further enhance your existing programs will allow you to produce the necessary Return On your Investment!


Webinars

Diagnosing Conditions in Electric Motor Bearings
Chuck Peterson, Peterson Predictive Maintenance
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100 Failure Modes of Lubrication
Terry Harris, CMRP, Reliable Process Solutions
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Looking at plant and process lubrication through the process of RCM we find there are over 50 failure modes of lubrication. There are another 50 in the lubrication programs at the plant site. Understanding the failure modes helps to eliminate the failures.

Using the RCM process of determining failure modes, this webinar takes apart lubricant failures specific to all processes. It covers all failures from temperature, moisture, particles, and breaks them down so they can be eliminated in the plant environment. Then we will break down the lubrication program failures that are common in most operating plants around the world.


The 50 Failure Modes of Electric Motors
Terry Harris, CMRP, Reliable Process Solutions
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Electric motors fail many times at plant locations and sometimes cause costly downtime and create safety related issues. The motors fail for many reasons and in most cases we can eliminate many of these issues. By eliminating the failure modes the motor can last many more life cycles and reduce these downtime issues. Motor failures can be predicted with many PdM technologies and prevented with proper PM tasks. These failures can also be eliminated by being proactive and learning how to buy the right motor and install it correctly so it will last 15 years instead of 2 years.


Bearing Failure Mechanisms
Andy Page Director, Integration GPAllied
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Bearing Failure Mechanisms
An understanding of how a bearing or gear actually fails is paramount to understanding why condition monitoring technologies work the way they do. It also helps us understand how a condition monitoring technology like ultrasound, vibration analysis, or infrared thermography detects the defects they claim to detect. This session will focus on the mechanical and chemical ways bearings and gears fail. Concepts like lubricant dynamics, fatigue, adhesion, and abrasion will be covered in an attempt to help the participant understand the failure mechanisms of a bearing, what causes the mechanisms, what accelerates these mechanisms, and how they affect the life expectancy of a bearing. Understanding these mechanisms makes the information coming from the condition monitoring technologies much more meaningful and relevant.

Bearing Failure Mechanisms Part II
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As a follow-up to the Bearing Failure Mechanisms webinar (you can view part I webinar here ), this webinar will take the bearing failures to the next step. We will discuss applicable condition monitoring technologies and how they are applied to different bearing failures. We will discuss how each technology displays or detects different failure mechanisms within the bearing. We will also discuss how the different technologies complement each other with respect to detecting these failure mechanisms. The most important aspect of the webinar will be a discussion around the limitations and data collection considerations for each technology.


Monitoreo de Condición en Motores Eléctricos (En Español)
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El Ing. Carlos Hernandez Conti, Supervisor Senior de PdM y Confiabilidad Mecánica de la Terminal de LNG de Altamira
En donde nos comentará que hay varias maneras de aprovechar la utilización de la tecnología de ultrasonido, ya que al estar haciendo inspecciones con ultrasonido en los rodamientos de la terminal TLA, se le presentó la oportunidad de detectar problemas en los motores eléctricos. No solo incrementando la confiabilidad de los elementos rodantes, sino guardando la disponibilidad de los sistemas mecánicos como conjunto.

El Ing. Hernandez, llevó sus capacidades de diagnostico a un nuevo nivel, al utilizar satisfactoriamente las tablas de diagnostico de vibraciones en la información obtenida por ultrasonido, obteniendo resultados extraordinarios. Aplicando la teoría de vibraciones al análisis de ultrasonido ha logrado detectar problemas de barras rotas en rotores de motores eléctricos, donde su física de falla no tiene que ver con la fricción o los impactos y como consecuencia si no se configura su colector correctamente, estas pueden pasar desapercibidas. La severidad esta dictada por los números de armónicos, además de sus respectivas bandas laterales, mostrando sin duda una ventaja al recolectar los datos con ultrasonido en las inspecciones mecánicas, permitiéndole detectar fallas potenciales en etapas tempranas que de otra manera hubieran sido indetectables.


Lubricación de Precisión Basada en Condición (En Español)
Ing. Gerardo Trujillo, Noria Latin America
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Effective Lubrication Storage
Terry Harris, CMRP, Reliable Process Solutions
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Many plant operations do not understand the importance of where and how their lubricants are stored. All lubricants need to be stored in ambient controlled conditions. Keeping the lube at a controlled temperature and not suffering the temperature swings of the ambient conditions can allow most petroleum based lubes to last for 30 years. But in plants where the lubes are stored in the plant or in outside storage areas the ambient extremes can allow moisture, foreign material and other contaminants to enter the storage containers and lube equipment. This greatly shortens the lube life and lubrication effectiveness. This leads to drastically shortened equipment life.

After lubrication audits many plants struggle to find an adequate area to store their lubes. Locating an area that is isolated and can be air conditioned, heated, and sealed from contamination can be extremely difficult in the tight constraints of existing facilities.

This webinar will help plant personnel understand the importance of proper design and the requirements for storing lubricants. If you have a colleague that would benefit from attending, click here to forward this invitation to them.